Fundamentalist Atheists

Addendum: There have been some lively comments in response to the post below, but there seem to be misapprehensions that 1) I am calling all Atheists fundamentalists, and that 2) I am defending Abrahamic faiths, or that this blog is about Abrahamic faiths.

This is not so.

First, I am talking specifically about intolerance – when it appears among Atheists. Extremists (who are often marked by intolerance) are found in every group, and Atheists are no exception.

If you are Atheist and tolerant of other people’s religious and spiritual beliefs, then this article is NOT about you.

If you feel it could be about you, well, then try to take home the message of the golden rule, ‘Do unto others as you would have done to you’.

Second, please read “About the Author” And “About Helleneste kai Grammateus” before posting.

Thank you. Now for the post…

The Major religious groups of the world.

Major Religious Groups of the World Image via Wikipedia

I read a new term today: “Fundamentalist Atheists” referenced in KCRW’s The New Atheists.

The label is meant for those who don’t believe in any deity (soft or hard) and view the influence of any religion or spirituality as a threat to reason and science and fight back. They believe that religion inherently fosters ignorance and war and fight aggressively against beliefs in anything spiritual. Theirs is called the New Atheism movement.

I would agree that one can be Atheist and be Fundamentalist about it. One doesn’t have to believe in spirituality in order to be so adamant about that belief (or non-belief if you prefer) to proselytize and show intolerance. Continue reading

Hunger and Poverty

Have you thought of giving to charity as an offering in the name of Zeus Sôtêr “the Savior” and Epidôtês “Giver of Good”?*

You can do it remotely from the computer, and without spending anything!

I’ve added the option to my sidebar for folks visiting Helleneste kai Grammateus to donate to charity.  How?  By clicking on the icon for Hunger and Poverty, the sponsor(s) will donate towards this charity, and feed the impoverished.  The sponsors will change, but the cause was my choice:  Hunger and Poverty.  My goal is to raise 400 points.

You may be asked to participate in an “event”.  The one I just did rated an advertisement video by PowerBar (fitting, hu?).  When I spent my time on this, I earned points for the charity, which works to feed those who need it most.

Consider a donation of your time to the charity as an offering.  Say a prayer to Zeus,the Savior and Giver of Good when you do so! : )

 http://www.socialvibe.com/?r=706516

Reference
*  SOTER (Sôtêr), i. e. “the Saviour” (Lat. Servator or Sospes), occurs as the surname of several divinities:– 1. of Zeus in Argos (Paus. ii. 20. § 5), at Troezene (ii. 31. § 14), in Laconia (iii. 23. § 6), at Messene (iv. 31. § 5), at Mantineia (viii. 9. § l), at Megalopolis (viii. 30. § 5; comp. Aristoph. Ran. 1433 ; Plin. H. N. xxxiv. 8). The sacrifices offered to him were called sôtêria. (Plut. Arat. 53.) 2. Of Helios (Paus. viii. 31. § 4), and 3. of Bacchus. (Lycoph. 206.)
 Theoi.com

Vatican Celebrates Galileo

The church denounced Galileo‘s theory as dangerous to the faith. Tried as a heretic in 1633 and forced to recant, he was sentenced to life imprisonment, later changed to house arrest.

The ruling helped fuel accusations that the church was hostile to science — a reputation the Vatican has been trying to shed ever since.

In 1992, Pope John Paul II declared that the ruling against Galileo was an error resulting from “tragic mutual incomprehension.”

The exhibit, and other Vatican initiatives to mark the 400th anniversary of Galileo’s telescope and the U.N.-designated International Year of Astronomy, is part of the Vatican’s continuing rehabilitation effort.

From here.

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Agora (2009) To Open

I learned of the release of Agora at Kallisti in Spain on October 6th, 2009. I hope it’ll come out in the US soon.


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Temple of Nemisis Unearthed

Nemesis holding the wheel of fortune, her righ...

Nemesis holding the Wheel of Fortune Image via Wikipedia

From here:

Archaeologists have found traces of a temple built for the Greek goddess of divine retribution, Nemesis, during excavations in the ancient city of Agora in the Aegean port city of İzmir. Akın Ersoy of Dokuz Eylül University‘s archaeology department and heading the archaeological excavations in the ancient city, told the Anatolia news agency on Monday that they speculated there might be a temple built for Nemesis in the area.

“We found traces of such a temple during our excavations in Agora,” he said.

“We want to concentrate our work to unearth the temple in the future.”

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Should Modern Hellenic Polytheists Have Clergy? Part 2

This post is continued from Should We Have Clergy? I

It has been suggested that we don’t need clergy to teach us the basics of our religion.  Instead academics, “serious amateurs”, and those with a degree in the classics can serve as our sole experts.

However, there are a couple of problems I perceive with this proposal of relying solely on those immersed in academia.
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Should Modern Hellenic Polytheists Have Clergy? Part 1

The priestess of Bacchus

Priestess of Dionysos (Bacchus) Image via Wikipedia

There is a lot of negative feeling currently among (at least one group of) Hellenic Recons surrounding the terms “clergy“, “priest”, “minister”, etc. because of how some monotheistic branches have employed these positions in combination with proselytizing.  Some don’t recognize clergy ordained by Hellenion (or other groups) and don’t want the creation of clergy in Hellenismos at all.  I think this comes from lingering resentment towards the dogma and attitude of some members of Christianity and Islam in particular.

Yes, historically there are cases of abuse – hence, in Christianity, the entire thrust of the Reformation – but that shows how Christianity itself hasn’t had a united view of church authority.

Yet, I think Hellenic clergy can, and will be, what we make of it. It need not be modeled on another faith, or have a disrespectful, dismissive, abusive, or personality worship approach. No, I don’t think that there is an inherent danger to making clergy, I don’t agree that it’s human nature to abuse these positions. I think clergy in Hellenismos can do a lot of good and that we can make it what we want it to be.
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