The 2010 Hellenion Calendar

Photograph of Supreme Council of Ethnikoi Hell...

Supreme Council of Ethnikoi Hellenes (YSEE) ritual in Greece via Wikipedia

Many people have expressed interest in the 2010 Hellenion Calendar and how to find it.  I am including a link in here for interested, and also updating the links page for Helleneste kai Grammateus.

The 2010 Hellenion Calendar

The calendar is based on the monthly and annual observances and festivals of the ancient Athenians from about 800 BCE to 323 BCE. This version was created using information derived from http://www.numachi.com/~ccount/hmepa and from http://aa.usno.navy.mil/data/docs/MoonPhase.html as well as the sources Greek Religion by Walter Burkert (Harvard University Press, 1977, English translation: Basil Blackwell Publisher and Harvard University Press, 1985), Old Stones, New Temples; ancient Greek paganism reborn, by Drew Campbell (Xlibris Corporation, 2000) and Festivals of the Athenians, by H. W.Parke (London, Thames and Hudson, 1977)…

In addition to ancient festivals and observances, certain modern occasions are listed as well. This includes the Hellenion monthly libation (ensuring that at least one day a month is shared by a community, albeit scattered, at the same time, and also ensuring that each of the twelve Olympians is honored at least once during the year). Note that this libation is not an official practice of Hellenion but a voluntary activity endorsed by many Hellenion members.  Some modern festivals are also listed, such as Heliogenna, held over several days during the shortest days of December, and Prometheia, held in Greece on the summer solstice near Mt. Olympos (see http://www.ysee.gr/index-eng.php for more information about this festival).

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Err…This Is Unexpected

Ever since I posted Why Pagans Aren’t Taken Seriously I’ve received a number of search engine hits for all things regarding to pagan symbols. This is because I included an image-link in that article to stones painted with various pagan symbols to represent different paths. The steady trend has prompted me to write an article on just that (pagan symbols) because I’m pretty convinced folks were detoured here while searching for something more specific on that subject.

Yet more surprising: I wrote one ritual outline for Mounukhia titled Honoring Artemis Potnia Theron Fosoros on Mounukhia and just yesterday there were 67 page views with 42 of those on the Mounukhia article and 39 search engine searches for the word “artemis” leading to this blog. This is the second busiest day Helleneste kai Grammateus has had…but I posted that article almost two weeks ago.

*blink*

What happened? Is someone out there searching for Artemis over and over and over again; is there a group researching how to conduct a ritual in Her honor because an event is coming soon; or is this article referenced somewhere I am not aware of? Are you looking because you like what I’ve put out there and want more of it, or are you passing through on the way to somewhere else? Let me know, OK?  Continue reading

Honoring Artemis Potnia Theron Fosoros on Mounukhia

Àrtemis mata Acteó

Artemis Image by Sebastià Giralt via Flickr

The Mounukhia festival honors Artemis as her titles Potnia Theron (the Mistress of Beasts) and Artemis Fosforos (Artemis the Light-Bringer). It begins with a pompe in which the people carry round cakes in which small torches, or dadia, are stuck. These cakes are called amphiphontes (round-shining). They are offered to Artemis in thanks for the lives of beasts that were killed during the hunt, and for the light of the moon. Cupcakes studded with birthday candles make a simple and thoughtful substitute. Glaux Nest

Mounukhia is an ancient Greek festival dedicated to Artemis. It falls between late April and early May in the month of Mounukhion in the ancient Greek calendar. At this festival, Artemis is celebrated in her titles as Potnia Theron (the Mistress of Animals) and Artemis Fosforos (Artemis the Light-Bringer).

As with all Greek rituals, the participants are to be cleansed of miasma (negative energy) by first washing their hands and asperging themselves with water.

An offering of thanks is given to Artemis for the lives of beasts that were killed during the hunt, and for the light of the moon, in the form of a meat offering and cakes called amphiphontes. Amphiphonton (the singular) means “shining-all-around” because the cakes are ringed with lit candles to symbolize the light of the moon. The meat that was offered to her was generally a stag or some type of wild game, though modern reconstructionists have been known to sacrifice meat from the market, or even small cakes in the shape of stags.

The Mounukhia ritual also may include the reading of her hymns, and the telling of myths associated with the Goddess of the Hunt. Richard – The Pagan Village

Ritual Outline: Honoring Artemis Potnia Theron (Mistress of Beasts) & Fosforos (Light-Bringer)

Why Pagans Aren’t Taken Seriously

Pagan symbols on stones

Various Pagan symbols etched and painted on stones.

A very dynamic discussion opened on Mystic Wicks titled Is Paganism Taken Seriously?. I answered (first clarifying that “Paganism” itself isn’t a religion anymore than “Monotheism” is [both are categories]) that some people I’ve found are politely curious, but most either immediately change the subject or give me a “WTF?!” double-take.  I’ve also been told, in a roundabout way, that all mythology is hokey.

The discussion led to a spread of answers all circling around the same theme, in keeping with Pagan style.  There are a lot of quotes below, but trust me, I’m getting somewhere with this: Continue reading