The Difference Between Gods and Demi-Gods

Hades with Cerberus (Heraklion Archaeological ...

Hades with Cerberus via Wikipedia

Gods are immortal and have particular domains that They control/embody/personify. Demi-gods, or heros, are descended from god and mortal pairings. Demi-gods have abilities that surpass mortals, can cross domains that gods can not cross (like descending into Hades – something we don’t see any gods but the Chthonic gods do, because it isn’t Their realm [except for Hermes and Iris because They are messenger gods]). Yet mortals don’t have the power of gods and can be subject to the whims of gods. Mortals often have a special relationship with their parent god and sometimes are blessed with long life or immortality by their parent god or gods in general. Sometimes they have/had cult worship as well (as in, people pray[ed] to them in addition to the gods).

IMHO, Catholocism adapted the practice of worshiping demi-gods/heros to the worship of their saints (not the same figures in mythology/history, but rather, the very human tendency to elevate certain notable individuals to cult status and ascribing a divine quality to them).

What do you think a demi god is?  What do you think defines a god?

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Honoring Artemis Potnia Theron Fosoros on Mounukhia

Àrtemis mata Acteó

Artemis Image by Sebastià Giralt via Flickr

The Mounukhia festival honors Artemis as her titles Potnia Theron (the Mistress of Beasts) and Artemis Fosforos (Artemis the Light-Bringer). It begins with a pompe in which the people carry round cakes in which small torches, or dadia, are stuck. These cakes are called amphiphontes (round-shining). They are offered to Artemis in thanks for the lives of beasts that were killed during the hunt, and for the light of the moon. Cupcakes studded with birthday candles make a simple and thoughtful substitute. Glaux Nest

Mounukhia is an ancient Greek festival dedicated to Artemis. It falls between late April and early May in the month of Mounukhion in the ancient Greek calendar. At this festival, Artemis is celebrated in her titles as Potnia Theron (the Mistress of Animals) and Artemis Fosforos (Artemis the Light-Bringer).

As with all Greek rituals, the participants are to be cleansed of miasma (negative energy) by first washing their hands and asperging themselves with water.

An offering of thanks is given to Artemis for the lives of beasts that were killed during the hunt, and for the light of the moon, in the form of a meat offering and cakes called amphiphontes. Amphiphonton (the singular) means “shining-all-around” because the cakes are ringed with lit candles to symbolize the light of the moon. The meat that was offered to her was generally a stag or some type of wild game, though modern reconstructionists have been known to sacrifice meat from the market, or even small cakes in the shape of stags.

The Mounukhia ritual also may include the reading of her hymns, and the telling of myths associated with the Goddess of the Hunt. Richard – The Pagan Village

Ritual Outline: Honoring Artemis Potnia Theron (Mistress of Beasts) & Fosforos (Light-Bringer)

Clash of the Titans 2010 Review

As excited I am to see Greek mythology in modern media (and media inspired by mythology, like Percy Jackson), and as much as I like many of the actors in this movie, I was underwhelmed by this movie. Warning: spoilers below…
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New Resource Link for Classical Greek Correspondence in E-mail

Greek to Me (1)

Greek Handwriting Image by Kim Scarborough via Flickr

There has been a lot piling up of late. Big internal transitions in Hellenion, renewals for current members, ten new members (each with a customized membership kit to prepare), the civic holidays with family visiting, a seminar to coordinate for work, and because I’m getting the lay-off I’m looking for new work as well. Never the less, I have been working on some draft posts. Below is a quick update:

I’ve updated the links in the sidebar and on the links page to include a well-researched reference on how to adapt classical Greek (and Roman) salutations and closings for letters to modern day email.

I’ve used this to update official correspondence as Hellenion’s Grammatues:

(recipient-dat) para {PARA\} (sender-gen) = To (recipient) from (sender).
Tois Joe para Alexandra = To Joe from Alexandra

and

erromenon se hoi theoi diaphulattoien = May the Gods guard your well-being.

Today, I’ll close with this:

Ta d’ alla, seautou epimelou hin hugiaineis. For the rest, take care to stay well.